# Primary Sources on Copyright - Record Viewer

PRIMARY SOURCES

ON COPYRIGHT

(1450-1900)

Privilege to Giovanni Giolito di Ferrari for publication of Paolo Comitolo's "Catena in Beatissimum Job," and revocation of Jean Stratius' privilege in the same work, Vatican (1587)

Source: Vatican Secret Archives Sec. Brev. Reg. 130 F. 70 (1587)

Citation:
Privilege to Giovanni Giolito di Ferrari for publication of Paolo Comitolo's "Catena in Beatissimum Job," and revocation of Jean Stratius' privilege in the same work, Vatican (1587), Primary Sources on Copyright (1450-1900), eds L. Bently & M. Kretschmer, www.copyrighthistory.org

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            Chapter 2 Page 2 of 13 total



Superscript = inserted by original or different author between lines

[ ] = inserted by original or different author in margin

{ } = supplied by transcribers

Bold Script [or] Script or scribble = written in a different hand(s)

Strike through = crossed out, but legible

[XXX] = illegible

Translation (from Printed Edition)

Translator’s Warning to the Reader.

We have combined this book (first printed and typeset in Lyon), with an autograph manuscript, which we carefully copied out by hand. In this edition, which we have borne with great difficulty, we have discovered so many changes not only in words, but in meanings as well that we were forced to use this second Venetian edition, over which we preside, for the purpose of correcting those errors. Indeed, for this reason, those elements which were foreign [to the text] have been removed, and our own were restored; we have been able easily to cure those elements that had become corrupted. We have also explained faithfully several Greek meanings, which in the first Latin Commentary were lacking a Latin interpretation, based on a comparison with other and old Codices. Therefore we ourselves recognize this translation as if it were our own, and as the only legitimate translation of the Greek Commentaries, which translation has been set to type in the year 1587 in Venice at the house of Giolito, with us leading and correcting.



    


Superscript = inserted by original or different author between lines

[ ] = inserted by original or different author in margin

{ } = supplied by transcribers

Bold Script [or] Script or scribble = written in a different hand(s)

Strike through = crossed out, but legible

[XXX] = illegible

Printed Edition[1]

Warning

INTERPRETIS ADMONITIO

AD LECTOREM.

Librum hunc Lugdunensibus typis primum excusum, cum Autographo, manuq{ue} nostra scripto exemplari haud oscitanter contulimus. In eo, quod sane moleste tulimus, tam multa non solum verbis, sed sententiis etiam immutata reperimus; ut ad ea corrigenda secundam hanc editionem Venetam, cui ipsi praefuimus, adhibere coacti simus. Hac enim ratione, quae aliena erant, demere, nostra restituere; depravata sanare facile potuimus. No{n}nullas etiam sententias graecas, quae in primo Commentario latino latina carebant interpretatione, ex aliorum, veterumq{     ue} Codicum contentione fideliter explanavimus. Igitur ipsi tamquam nostram, ac legitimam gr{a}eci Commentarii interpretationem hanc solam agnoscimus, quae hoc anno M. D. LXXXVII Venetiis apud Iolitos, nobis agentibus, & corrigentibus, est typis mandata.

Vale.


[1] This text is transcribed from a printed version of the original handwritten petition (SBR 130.F. 70r - 71v). This printed version appears in a 1587 edition of Ferrari’s Catena in Beatissimum Job…, a digitized version of which can be viewed via this link. This privilege omits any reference to the Girolamo Mercuriale work for which Giolito also received a privilege (as referenced in the original handwritten privilege). Giolito published the Mercuriale work in a separate 1587 edition, which can be viewed via this link.



    


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Primary Sources on Copyright (1450-1900) is co-published by Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge, 10 West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DZ, UK and CREATe, School of Law, University of Glasgow, 10 The Square, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK